Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe

1 Book 
2 Origin

2A Science 
2A 1 Nothing comes from nothing
2A 1.2 Nature resolves all things back into their elements and never reduces anything to nothing
2A 2 Atoms 
2A 2.1 Motion
2A 2.2 Shapes, color, and weight
2A 2.3 Matter and Space
2A 3 World
2A 3.1 The creation
2A 3.2 Aliens
2A 3.3 Mother Earth
2A 3.4 The selection of change


3 Humans 
3A The creation of humans 

3A 1 Relationships
3A 1.1 Romance
3A 1.1a The desire
3A 1.1b The wanting
3A 1.1c The downhill
3A 1.1d Not easy to escape
3A 1.1e How to get over her
3A 1.1f Sex: Thick meeting watery, watery meeting thick.
3A 1.1g The proper sex
3A 1.1h The not proper sex
3A 1.1i Gentle days bring loving relationships
3A 1.2 The true face of a friend
3A 1.3 Power
3A 1.4 On a wasteful life person
3A 1.5 The never-ending unsatisfaction of humans
3A 1.6 Lvinin is the same through all ages
3A 1.7 The creation of common good
3A 1.8 Creating farming
3A 1.9 The evolution of delights and pleasure
3A 1.10 On myths
3A 1.11 On the beliefs
3A 1.12 Relationship with good and evil
3A 1.13 When we are born it is shown what to seek

3A 2 Mind 
3A 2.1 Language
3A 2.2 Anxiety
3A 2.3 Fear
3A 2.4 The mind desires by reason
3A 2.5 Fellings
3A 2.6 Atoms
3A 2.7 Infant 
3A 2.8 How is the image in our mind formed? 
3A 2.9 Mind is the beginning of action
3A 2.10 Sins are reviled in dreams
3A 2.11 Creativity

3A 3 Body 
3A 3.1 Motion
3A 3.2 Growing
3A 3.3 Nothing remains the same
3A 3.4 Death
3A 3.5 Nature vs Body
3A 3.6 Species
3A 3.7 One
3A 3.8 Vision
3A 3.9 Intelligence, just like health, doesn’t has a specific place in the body.
3A 3.10 When born you suffer


 

1 Book 
On the Nature of the Universe is a complex statement of the simplicity of the things, and tension between those two drives is not - and cannot be - resolved within the poem. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.xxx)

The Nature of the universe gives us both a glimpse into how the world is and a sense of what we can make of it. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p. xxxii)

The book is full of moral fervour, designed to rescue mankind from the fear of gods and the fear of death. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.5)

Book 1 and 2 set out the atomic theory, invented by the Greeks, that the universe consists of nothing but atoms and void. Book 3 demonstrates that the soul consists of the same, and dies when the body dies. Book 4 explains the mechanism of our senses, and goes on to discuss dreams and sex. Book 5 deals with the origin of the world and the dawn of human civilization. Book 6 considers thunderstorms, lightning, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, the Nile, the magnet, and diseases. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.5)

I teach how all things Must stay within the law of their creation And cannot annul the strong status of time. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.138)`

So in this way perchance my poetry Can hold your mind, while you attempt to grasp The Nature of the world and understand The great design and pattern of its making. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.30)


2 Origin 

All the whole wide world
Came into birth and in the end, must die;
And in what ways that mass of matter founded the earth and sky and sea and stars and son
And the moon’s orb; and then what animals
Arose from the earth, and what was never born;
And how men first made use of varied speech
Among themselves by finding names for things;
And how into their minds that fear of gods
Crept in, which overall the world keeps holy shrines, pools, groves, altars, and images of gods;
And by what force the course of the sun
And the moon’s movements pilot nature steers.
(Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.139)

2A Science 

2A 1 Nothing comes from nothing
Book 1 starts with two principles, that nothing ever came into being from nothing, and that nothing ever returns to nothing. Atoms are solid, indestructible, invisible, everlasting, and infinite in number, and there is a void, in which they move. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.5)

That nothing ever by divine power comes from nothing. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.7)

2A 1.2 Nature resolves all things back into their elements and never reduces anything to nothing
The next great principle is this: that nature Resolves all things back into their elements And never reduces anything to nothing. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.9)

2A 2 Atoms 
Atoms are solid, indestructible, invisible, everlasting, and infinite in number, and there is a void, in which they move. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.5)

2A 2.1 Motion
The universe contains many other worlds besides ours, and none are made by gods. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p. 5)

And here’s a thing that needs cause no surprise: That though all atoms are in ceaseless motion Their total seems to stand in total rest. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.45)

2A 2.2 Shapes, color, and weight
The number of similar shapes must be infinite, Or else the sum of matter would be finite, which I have proved it not to be, and in my verses Have shown that the universe is held together From infinity by particles of matter In an endless chain of impacts everywhere. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.51)

Things can be born, and being born can grow. Therefore, it is obvious that an infinite number of primal atoms exist of every kind so as to maintain the supply of everything. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.52)

The atoms of matter are whole without color. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.57)

Therefore a thing of equal size but lighter Declares itself to have more void inside it. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.13)

2A 2.3 Matter and Space
Consisting of two widely different things - Matter and the space in which things happen - Each must exist by itself unmixed with the other. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.17)

2A 3 World
Book 4 begins by showing that the world is mortal and will one day be destroyed. It was not made by gods, or by design, but by the random and accidental collision of atoms. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p. xxxviii)

2A 3.1 The creation
Now since spaces lie in all directions infinite And seeds in number numberless forever Fly all-around in countless different ways. (...) It must be deemed in high degree unlikely That this earth, this sky, alone have been created. (...) Nature made this world. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.65)

2A 3.2 Aliens
If there exists so great a store of atoms (...) And if she same great force of nature stands Ready to throw the seeds of things together (...) Then of necessary, you must accept That other earths exist, in other places, With varied tribes of men and breeds of beasts. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.65)

2A 3.3 Mother Earth
So it remains that earth does well deserve The name of a mother which we give to her Since from the earth all things have been created. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.159)

2A 3.4 The selection of change 
So therefore time the whole nature of the world Changes, and one state of the earth yields place to another, so that what it bore before it cannot bear; But can bear what it did not bear before. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.160)

Courage has kept the savage lion safe, Cunning the fox and speed the fleeing stag. The dog, our faithful watchman of the night. (etc...) (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.161

2A 3.5 Change
The sum of things Is thus forever renewed, and mortals live By mutual interchange one from another. Some races increase, another fade away, And in short space the breeds of living creatures Change, and like runners pass on the torch of life. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.38)

2A 3.6 How lightning occurs
The speed and violent stroke of thunderbolts And the swift fall with which they cleave the sky Have this as their cause: a force within the clouds, First everywhere aroused, accumulating Takes on mighty energy of movement. Then when the cloud cannot hold the growing impetus The force explodes and flies with wondrous speed Like missiles hurled from powerful catapults

2A 3.7 Diseases and the terrifying consequences in humans 
There is the elephant disease which by the Nile Is bred, in middle - Egypt and nowhere else. In Attica the feet are attacked, and in Achaea the eyes. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.212)

Throwing their bodies naked into the water. Many hurled themselves headlong into wells, their mouths Gaping to reach the water as they fell. Dry thirst unquenchable, drenching their bodies, Made streams of water no better than a trickle. Nor was there any respite to their pain; Their bodies lay exhausted; medicine Muttered beside the bed in silent fear, As all the while they rolled their staring eyes, sleepless, and burning with the fell disease. Then many signs of death began to appear. And disgusted with fear and sorrow, A gloomy bro, a furious frenzied face, Ears troubled and full of noises, breath confused And either painting fast or deep and Labored. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.214)

Severed their manly parts to save their lives, And some without their hands or feet yet still Clung on to life, and others lost their eyes, so strongly had the fear of death assailed them. And some oblivion of everything Took hold of, that they knew not who they are. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.215)

For life the pestilence wrenched out of them The lonely funerals, one racing with another Were rushed without a mourner to the grave. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.215)

The breath of life into his lips, and see The realms of heaven, this to another was Destruction and a minister of death. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.215)

One thing must woeful and most pitiful Was this: that when a man saw himself caught by the plague as if condemned to death Losing all heart he lay in misery, And so expecting death died where he lay. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.215)

Brought punishment, a foul and evil death, Bereft of help, deserted, all alone. But those that stood to help the plague destroyed, And toil, which honored drove them to endure, Hearing the pleading voices of the weary. Listening to the sad voice of complaint. In this way, all the noblest met their death. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.216)

Wearied with fears and sorrow they returned, And many then took to their beds in grief. Nor could a man be found at such a time whom neither plague nor death nor grief had touched. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.216)

Moreover now the shepherd and the herdsman And the strong steersman of the curving plow, All, all were fainting. Deep within their huts Their bodies huddled lay, consigned to death By poverty and by the foul disease. And sometimes you might see the lifeless bodies Of parents lying upon their lifeless children, Or see in turn the children breathe their last Upon the bodies of their mothers and fathers. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.216)

And this affliction to no small extent Flowed to the city from the countryside. (...) And overcome by thirst bodies lay strewn Along the roadsides by the drinking fountains Of multitudes from whom the breath of life Had been cut off by water all too welcome. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.216)

And all the holy temples of the gods Death filled with lifeless bodies, and everywhere The shrines of the Celestials, which the priests Had filled with guests, stood loaded high with corpses. For reverence now and worship of the gods counted for little, present grief was all. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.217)

No longer to the ancient customs stood Of burial, which the city was wont to use. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.217)

Sudden need and poverty inspired them To many actions horrible and shameful. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.217)

They shed much blood rather than leave the bodies. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.217)

2A 3.8 What are magnets 
Which the Greeks call magnet, naming it from its home Since it is found within the Magnetic’s land. (...) In matters of this kind, you cannot grasp the real explanation unless first Much is established; the approach must be Extremely lengthy, winding, roundabout. So all the more I crave attentive ears and mind. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.206)

2A 3.9 The mirror nature hold against us
Look back upon the ages of time past Eternal, before we were born, and see That they have been nothing to us, nothing at all. This is the mirror nature holds for us To show the face of time to come when we, At last, are dead. Is there in this for us Anything horrible? Is there anything sad? Is it not more free from care than any sleep? (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.96)

For to seek power that’s empty and never got And always vainly toil and sweat for it This is to strain to push up the steep hill The rock that always from the very top Rolls headlong down again to the plain below. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.96)

2A 3.10 To explore or not
Earth teems with wild beasts and is filled with fear Through forests and great mountains and deep thickets: Though as a rule, it lies within our power To show these places and leave them unvisited. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.138)

2A 3.11 Understanding nature
Understanding involves both the face of nature and her laws, both the world of color, light, and sound and the blind dance of the atoms in the void. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.xix)

2A 4 Universe 

2A 4.1 There is no end 
The upshot is That nowhere in the universe can ba A final edge, and no escape be found From the endless possibility of flight. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p. 31)

2A 4.2 Stars
When we look upward to the heavenly realms Of the great firmament and see the sky bedecked with sparkling stars, and when we think Of the sure course of the sun and the moon, Then in our hearts already worn with woes A new anxiety lifts up its head, whether some power beyond all reckoning Hangs over us perchance of gods, that make the bright stars in their varied courses move. The doubting, whether some final end is set for it, when all The mighty bastions of the world no longer Can bear the forces of its restless motion, Or whether by power divine forever sure They glide eternally through the course of ages And scorn the power of time immeasurable. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.171)

 
 

3 Humans 

3A The creation of humans 
Calling on Orcus with hert-rending cries (...) With none to help, not knowing what wounds need. (...) One day did not destroy, nor did rough seas Dash ships and men together on the rocks. Then all in vain, all useless, all for nothing, The sea would rise and roar and then again Lightly lay down her empty threats. (...) The man unknowing poured poison for themselves, Today with greater skill they poison others. (...) And then, when huts and skins and fire they had got themselves, And woman joined with man had made a home, And laws of married life were known to them, And they saw loving children born to them, Then first the human race began to soften. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.165)

3A 1 Relationships


3A 1.1 Romance

3A 1.1a The desire
Seeds everywhere - whether a boy with girlish limbs has thrown it or a woman from her whole body launches love, He leans towards the blow, desires to unite, And cast the fluid from body into body; His speechless yearning tells of bliss to come. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.129)

3A 1.1b The wanting
The wonting of each other: They ask themselves what it is they are craving for, They can find no device to cure their ill, Bewildered and confused they waste away, The hapless victims of an unseen wound. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.131)

3A 1.1c The downhill
The Downhill: All useless; since from the very fount of joy something bitter comes, and midst the flowers Brings torment. Perchance a guilty conscience bites With rue for years of idleness and vice, Perchance she’s spoken some doubtful word which sticks And burns like fire in his yearning heart; Or else he thinks she moves her eyes too much, Too many glances at another man, And in her face a hint of mockery. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.131)

3A 1.1d Hard to escape
For to avoid being captured in the snares of love Is not so difficult as to escape
Once in, and break the powerful knots of Venus. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.131)

3A 1.1e How to get over her
Still, there are others: still, we have lived so far
Without this woman; still, as well we know,
She does things which the plainest women do. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.133)

3A 1.1f Sex: Thick meeting watery, watery meeting thick.
Sex: Thick meeting watery, watery meeting thick. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.135)

3A 1.1g The approved sex
For in the manner of four-footed beasts, It is generally thought that woman best conceives,
Breast down and loins uplifted, so the seeds can take more easily their proper places. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.136)


3A 1.1h The not approved sex
If in delight she holds his penis close Between her buttocks, and all her body limp, Flows with the waves and sways with every tide. She turns the furrow from its rightful course under plowshare, makes the seed fall wide. Whores do this for their private purpose. (...) clearly, our wives can find no use for this. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.136)


3A 1.1i Gentle days bring loving relationships
Gentle pleasing ways can easily Accustom you to share your life with her. And for the rest - by costum love is bred. Something which feels a blow, however light, But frequently, must in the end give way. Do you not see how even a drop of water By constant dripping wears away a stone? (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.136)


3A 1.2 The true face of a friend
Thus, when in perils and adversity A man has fallen, it’s more useful than To look at him and easier to know him. For only then from out the heart's deep core True voices rise, the mask’s stripped off, the man Remains. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.71)


3A 1.3 Power
For to seek power that’s empty and never got And always vainly toil and sweat for it This is to strain to push up the steep hill The rock that always from the very top Rolls headlong down again to the plain below. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.96)


3A 1.4 On a wasteful life person
Already, while you live and see, your life Is all but dead, you waste most of your time in sleep. You snore while wide awake; and dream incessantly; and always in your mind you’re plagued with fear that’s meaningless, and often you can’t make out what is wrong with you, oppressed, you drunken wretch, by cares on every side, and drift on shifting tides of fantasy. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.99)


3A 1.5 The never-ending unsatisfaction of humans
A certain end of life is fixed for men. There is no escape from death and must die. Again, we live and move and have our being In the same place always, and no new pleasures By living longer can be hammered out. But while we can’t get what we want, that seems Of all things most desirable. Once got, We must haw something else. One constant thirst of life besets us open-mouthed. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.100)


3A 1.6 Lvinin is the same through all ages
Live though you may through all ages that you wish, No less that eternal death will still await, And no less long a time will be no more He who today from light his exit made Than he who perished months and years ago. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.100)


3A 1.7 The creation of common good
Hence comes the fear of punishment that stains The prizes of life. For violence and wrong Enmesh a man and off recoil upon him; Nor easily with calm and quiet mind can he abide who violates the bonds Of peace established for the common good. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.169)


3A 1.8 Creating farming
A model for sowing and for grafting plants Nature herself the great creatress formed. Berries and acorns fallen beneath the trees sent up in season due  a sworm of shoots. From this, they learned too to graft slips in branches And plant young tender saplings in the fields. Next, different types of housbandry they tried one after another in their cherished plots, And saw wild fruits grow fame in the sweet soil with loving care and gentle humouring. And day by day they made the woods retreat Ever higher up the hills, surrending The place below to filth, to make for them Meadows and crops, pools, streams, and smiling vineyards. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.175)


3A 1.9 The evolution of delights and pleasure
All the rewards, all the delights of life, songs, pictures, statues curiously wrought, All these they learned by practice gradually And by experiments of eager minds As step by step they made their forward way. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.178)
So each thing in its turn by slow degrees Time doth bring forward to the lives of men, And reason lifts it to the light of day. For as one concept followed on another Men saw it from and brighten in their minds Till by their arts they scaled the highest peak. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.178)


3A 1.10 On myths
Centaurus never existed, nor at any time. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.162)


3A 1.11 On the belief
Wherefore, if anyone pretends that beasts Of such a Kind could have been brought to birth (...) Let him continue with his nonsense, Let him believe that rivers ran with gold. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.162)

3A 1.12 Relationship with good and evil
Every animal, as soon as it is born, seeks for pleasure and delights in it as the Chief Good, while it recoils from pain as the Chief Evil and so far as possible avoids it. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.xx)



3A 2 Mind 
This mind, I know proposed to explain to you, what kind of thing is it. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.73)


3A 2.1 Language
As ancient ravens do and flocks of rooks, Or so they say, when they cry out for rain To bring them water or summon wind and storm. Therefore if animals are caused by different feelings, Dumb though they be, to utter different sounds, So much the more and with compelling reason Must we suppose that men could in those days Mark different things by different sounds of speech. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.167)

In truth I think the world is young and new And in quite recent time its life began see even now some arts are being refined And others springing up and growing; in ships Many new things have now been done, and lately Musicians found out tuneful harmonies. Yes, and the nature and order of this world In recent time has been discovered, and this I now myself the very first am found Able to tell it in our native tongue. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.146)


Therefore to think that someone then alloted Names to things, and that men learnt words from him, Is folly. Why should we think that this man had the power To mark all things with voices and to utter The various sounds of speech, and not believe That others had the power to do the same? (...) Whence was the concept of this usefulness Implanted in him, whence first came the power To picture in his mind what he should do? (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.166)

3A 2.2 Anxiety
Anxieties are caused by doubts; the explanations which remove these doubts must themselves be securely based or the doubts will return. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.xviii)

A joy it is, when the strong winds of storm Stir up the waters of a mighty sea, To watch from shore the troubles of another. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.36)


3A 2.3 Fear
Our lives in very truth Are but an endless labour in the dark, For we, like children labour in the dark. For we, like children Frightened of the dark, Are sometimes frightened of the dark, Are sometimes frightened in the light-of things No more to be feared than fears that the dark Distress a child, thinking they may came true. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.37)


3A 2.4 The mind desires by reason
The mind desires by reasoning to find what may exist there far away, the bourne To which the exploring intellect aspires, To which the mind’s thrust flies for ever free. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.65)


3A 2.5 Fellings
There’s something in us all the time that feels In many ways, and takes into itself Movements of pleasure and the heart’s vain cares. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.73)

Placed in the middle region of the breast. For here throb fear and terror, here abides Sweet melting joy, and therefore intelligence And mind are. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.74)


3A 2.6 Atoms
Now, therefore, since we have found the mind to be Extremely mobile, of necessity It must consist of atoms extremely small And smooth and round. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.75)


3A 2.7 Infant 
When life begins, in a mother’s limbs And womb, body and spirit learn so well The ways of life, that if they are separated Damage and ruin follow instantly. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.79)


3A 2.8 How is the image in our mind formed? 
The first question is, why is it that the mind, As soon as it fancies something, thinks of it? Is there an image that waits upon our will and as soon as we wish presents itself to us, of sea or land, as we may choose, or sky? (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.123)


3A 2.9 Mind is the beginning of action
Hemce gollow will: for no one ever begins Anything unless the mind has first foreseen what it wills to do (and what the mind foresees Is the image of the thing). When it conceives the wish of walking forward immediately strikes the mass of spirit Dispersed through all the body and the limbs. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.125)


3A 2.10 Sins are reviled in dreams
Though he should keep it hid from gods and men, Yet he must wonder how his sin can stay secret forever, seeing that many men Talking in dreams or raving in distance Are said to have betrayed themselves, and brought Long-hidden crimes into the light of day. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.169)


3A 2.11 Creativity
What things move the mind (...) that images of things Many in many modes wander about In all directions, thin, and easily Unite when they meet in the air, like spiders, webs Or leaf of gold, of texture much more thin Than those which strikes the eyes and provoke vision. For they penetrate the chinks of the body and stir The thin substance of the mind and provoke sensation. Centaurs and mermaids in this way we see. (...) For images of every kind fly everywhere (...) No image of centauros came from life (...) But when the images of man and horse Happen to meet, they easily adhere Because of their subtle nature and thin texture. All things of this kind are made in this way As I showed before, any one of these fine images By a single touch can easily move the mind (...) what in the mind we see Like what we see with our eyes - it needs must be That both are caused by similar processes. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.121)



3A 3 Body 
But as it is, since each thing is created From fixed specific seeds, the source from which It is born and comes forth into the shores of the light Is its material and its primal atoms. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.8)


3A 3.1 Motion
So you may see that the heart begins the motion Then mind and will join in and drive it on Until it reaches all the body and limbs. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.44)
From this we know That spirit is linked with mind; when struck by mind The spirit drives the body and compels it. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.74)


3A 3.2 Growing
All things grow slowly, as is natural, From a fixed seed, and growing keep their character. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.8)

So you may sooner think that many bodies Are common to many things, like letters in a word, Than that anything can exist without first beginnings. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.9)


3A 3.3 Nothing remains the same
But since an end must come to all her bearing She ceased, like a woman worn out by old age. For time doth change the nature of the world; One state of things must pass into another; Nothing remains the same. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.160)


3A 3.4 Death
Death does not destroy things when they die So as to bring destruction to their atoms, But breaks their combination everywhere, And then makes new conjunctions, making all things. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.64)


3A 3.5 Nature vs Body
But sun and moon the watchmen of the world-circling with light the vast rotating vault Have taught men well that seasons of the year Revolve, and that in all things is established A pattern and order fixed which governs them. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.177)


3A 3.6 Species
Add to this that nothing in the universe Is born unique and grows unique, alone, But all belong to a species, very many Of the same Kind. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.65)


3A 3.7 One
Book 3 discusses the nature of the mind and spirit - the soul. They are part of man just as much as his body. They act together on the body (...) “ Therefore death nothing is to us” (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.xxxviii)

The intelligence, in which is situated The understanding and the government Of life, is a part of man, no less than hands And feet and eyes are part of the living being. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.72)

Though many wise philosophers have thought That it is not placed in a definite part, but is A sort of vital essence of the body, called harmony by the Greeks. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.73)


3A 3.8 Vision
Images therefore clearly are the cause Of vision, and without them, nothing can be seen. Now, these images I speak of are flying around everywhere and sprayed about in all directions; But since it is only with our eyes we see them If follows that only where we turn our sight There all things strike it with their form and color. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.107)


3A 3.9 Intelligence, just like health, doesn’t have a specific place in the body.
Intelligence is not in any part; as when the body Is said to be in good health, but health is not A part of it, so in no definite place They place the mind - and here they plainly err. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p.73)


3A 3.10 When born you suffer
And then the child, like sailor cast ashore By cruel waves, lies naked on the ground, Sans speech, sans all the aids that life requires, When nature first into the shores of light In throes has cast him from his mother’s womb And fills the place with cries - as well he might seeing that so great ills await his life. (Lucretius: On the Nature of the Universe - Oxford- p143)