Money

Philosophy Book Notes

Books used 

Plato - The Laws (Penguin)

2 Notes selected

Diogenes and the Cynics (Oxford)

1 Notes selected

Seneca - Dialogues and Essays (Oxford)

1 Notes selected

Money

The Formula

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The citizens will not tolerate a settelment in wich they are deprived of gold and silver, and have the number of their families regulated, and the sites of their houses fixed by law. It will be said that our city is a mere image of wax. And the legislator will answer “ I knowit, but I wimantain that we ought to set forth an ideal wich is as perfect as possible”. (Plato Laws 37)

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To appreciate the benefits of such an institution a man requires to be well educated; for he certainly will not make a fortune in our state. (Plato Laws p. 37)Coins current only national - No gold for ind. (Plato Laws p. 161)

Ideal amount

A selection of notes to understand Money. 

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Where money is concerned, the ideal amount is one that does not fall into poverty and yet is not far removed from poverty. (Seneca - Dialogues and Essays Oxford p.126)

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When he was once making a sea-voyage (...) he took out his money and began to count it, and then, as if by accident, let it drop into the sea (...) “better for the money to be lost trough Aristippos than Aristippos through the money. (Diogenes - Oxford p.130)

The Control of Plato

Losing oneself in it

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Text Version:

1 Ideal amount
Where money is concerned, the ideal amount is one that does not fall into poverty and yet is not far removed from poverty. (Seneca - Dialogues and Essays Oxford p.126)

2 Losing oneself in it
When he was once making a sea-voyage (...) he took out his money and began to count it, and then, as if by accident, let it drop into the sea (...) “better for the money to be lost trough Aristippos than Aristippos through the money. (Diogenes - Oxford p.130)

3 The Control of Plato
The citizens will not tolerate a settelment in wich they are deprived of gold and silver, and have the number of their families regulated, and the sites of their houses fixed by law. It will be said that our city is a mere image of wax. And the legislator will answer “ I knowit, but I wimantain that we ought to set forth an ideal wich is as perfect as possible”. (Plato Laws 37)

To appreciate the benefits of such an institution a man requires to be well educated; for he certainly will not make a fortune in our state. (Plato Laws p. 37)

Coins current only national - No gold for ind. (Plato Laws p. 161)